noSOULrobot
noSOULrobot
+
playstatixn:

Luxury // Urban // Nature // Fashion
+
yagazieemezi:

The fam
+
chuckstr:

Portrait : Patrice | 2013
+
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

This past summer an exhibition nearly 60 years in the making put the fashionable gents of Jamaican subculture known as ‘Rudeboys’ front and center in an exhibition at Somerset House called “Return of the Rudeboy”. In 1960s Jamaica, “rudeboys” represented rebellious youth angry at unemployment and disenfranchisement (poverty, poor housing, lack of food) happening in Jamaican shantytowns. They were men sharply dressed in pork pie hats, mohair suits, freshly polished brogues, children of the ska music scene who were known for mincing words with law enforcement and disrupting through means of violence.
The Jamaican subculture found a subsequent home in England in the 1970s and 1980s, and, fast-forwarding a few decades, its cool has deepened in modern day England. The rudeboys (and gals) photographer Dean Chalkey’s ‘Return of the Rudeboy’ exhibition–curated by stylist and creative director Harris Eliott–reflect a modern rudeboy whose influence is less about disrupting and more about influencing music, fashion, art, technology and business. The term rudeboy has grown from being a slang term exclusive to one sect, to encompassing a lifestyle that is more inclusive to both men and women. Projecting ones individuality through style and attitude is the cornerstone. Rudeboys today in a sense have taken their style cues from their predecessors of cool, and have become the leading creatives and entrepreneurs.(via Washington Post)
All Photos by Dean Chalkey/Somerset House
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
Album Art
10,924 plays 
+
trulyyoursindeed:

Kelis. One of the first concert I’ve been to in Paris, early 2001.
Great show! Such an inspiration!
+
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
brynnasaurus:

My favorite part of the new She-Hulk series (other than everything) is Kevin Wada’s gorgeous covers.
+
+
+
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
Crater Lake Trip 2014
+
+